Category: physics

One of the great challenges in visualizing fluid flows is the…

One of the great challenges in visualizing fluid flows is the freedom of movement. A fluid particle – meaning some tiny little bit of fluid we want to follow – is generally free to move in any direction and even change its shape (but not mass). This makes tracking all of those changes difficult, and it’s part of why there are so many different techniques for flow visualization. The technique an experimenter uses depends on the information they hope to get. 

Often a researcher may want to know about fluid velocity in two or more directions, which can require multiple camera angles and more than one laser sheet illuminating the flow. An alternative to such a set-up is shown above. The injected fluid – known as a rheoscopic fluid – contains microscopic reflective particles, in this case mica, that are asymmetric in shape. Imagine a tiny rod, for example. By illuminating the rod from different directions with different colors of light, you can determine the particle’s orientation based on the color it reflects. Since the orientation of the particle depends on the surrounding flow, you can infer how the flow moves. (Image credit and submission: J. C. Straccia; research link: V. Bezuglyy et al.)

Posted in flow visualization, fluid dynamics, fluids as art, physics, rheoscopic fluid, sciblr, science, vortex ring

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If you’ve ever popped open a chilled bottle of champagne, you’ve…

If you’ve ever popped open a chilled bottle of champagne, you’ve probably witnessed the gray-white cloud of mist that forms as the cork flies. Opening the bottle releases a spurt of high-pressure carbon dioxide gas, although that’s not what you see in the cloud. The cloud consists of water droplets from the ambient air, driven to condense by a sudden drop in temperature caused by the expansion of the escaping carbon dioxide. Scientifically speaking, this is known as adiabatic expansion; when a gas expands in volume, it drops in temperature. This is why cans of compressed air feel cold after you’ve released a few bursts of air. 

If your champagne bottle is cold (a) or cool (b), the gray-white water droplet cloud is what you see. But if your champagne is near room temperature ( c ), something very different happens: a blue fog forms inside the bottle and shoots out behind the cork. To understand why, we have to consider what’s going on in the bottle before and after the cork pops. 

A room temperature bottle of champagne is at substantially higher pressure than one that’s chilled. That means that opening the bottle makes the gas inside undergo a bigger drop in pressure, which, in turn, means stronger adiabatic expansion. Counterintuitively, the gas escaping the warm champagne actually gets colder than the gas escaping the chilled champagne because there’s a bigger pressure drop driving it. That whoosh of carbon dioxide is cold enough, in fact, for some of the gas to freeze in that rushed escape. The blue fog is the result of tiny dry ice crystals scattering light inside the bottleneck. 

That flash of blue is only momentary, though, and the extra drop in temperature won’t cool your champagne at all. Liquids retain heat better than gases do. For more, on champagne physics check out these previous posts. (Image and research credit: G. Liger-Belair et al.; submitted by David H.)

Posted in champagne, condensation, fluid dynamics, physics, sciblr, science, thermodynamics

Building microfluidic circuits is generally a multi-day process,…

Building microfluidic circuits is generally a multi-day process, requiring a clean room and specialized manufacturing equipment. A new study suggests a quicker alternative using fluid walls to define the circuit instead of solid ones. The authors refer to their technique as “Freestyle Fluidics”. As seen above, the shape of the circuit is printed in the operating fluid, then covered by a layer of immiscible, transparent fluid. This outer layer help prevent evaporation. Underneath, the circuit holds its shape due to interfacial forces pinning it in place. Those same forces can be used to passively drive flow in the circuit, as shown in the lower animation, where fluid is pumped from one droplet to the other by pressure differences due to curvature. Changing the width of connecting channels can also direct flow in the circuits. This technique offers better biocompatibility than conventional microfluidic circuits, and the authors hope that this, along with simplified manufacturing, will help the technique spread. (Image and research credit: E. Walsh et al., source)

Posted in biology, contact angle, fluid dynamics, Laplace pressure, microfluidics, physics, sciblr, science, surface tension

Surface tension is the result of an imbalance between…

Surface tension is the result of an imbalance between intermolecular forces near an interface. Imagine a water molecule far from the surface; it is surrounded on all sides by other water molecules and feels each of those pulling on it. Since all the nearby molecules are water, the tugs from every direction balance and there is no net force. Now imagine that water molecule near the air interface. Instead of being influenced on all sides by water, our molecule now feels water in some directions and air molecules in another. The water molecules tug harder on it than air, leaving a net force that pulls along the interface. This is surface tension, and, for a liquid-gas interface, it behaves somewhat like an elastic sheet. Surface tension is even strong enough to let a jet of soap solution bounce repeatedly off a soap film. Each bounce deforms the interface, like a trampoline dimpling when someone jumps on it, but surface tension keeps the interface taut enough for the jet to skip off without breaking it. (Image credit: C. Kalelkar and S. Phansalkar, source)

Posted in bouncing jet, fluid dynamics, physics, sciblr, science, soap film, surface tension

Everyone has watched a flag flutter in the breeze, but you may…

Everyone has watched a flag flutter in the breeze, but you may not have given much thought to it. One of the earliest scientists to consider the problem was Lord Rayleigh, who wrote an aside on the mathematics of an infinite flag flapping in a paper on jets (pdf). Today researchers consider the problem in terms of fluid-solid interaction; in other words, to study a fluttering flag, you must consider both the properties of the flag – its flexibility, length, elasticity, and so on – and the properties of the fluid – air speed, viscosity, etc. The combination of these factors governs the complicated shapes taken on by a flag. The image above is a composite of several photos of a string (a 1-d flag) flapping in a flow that moves from left to right. By combining photos, the image highlights the envelope of shapes the flag takes and demonstrates at a glance just how far the flag flutters in either direction along its length. (Image credit: C. Eloy)

Posted in aeroelasticity, flag, flags, fluid dynamics, fluid-solid interaction, flutter, physics, sciblr, science

drnikolatesla: The 3 Greatest Minds of All Time 3. Leonardo Da…

drnikolatesla:

The 3 Greatest Minds of All Time

3. Leonardo Da Vinci

Italian polymath whose areas of interest included invention, painting, sculpting, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, writing, history, and cartography. He has been variously called the father of palaeontology, iconology, and architecture, and is widely considered one of the greatest painters of all time. Sometimes credited with the inventions of the parachute, helicopter and tank, he epitomised the Renaissance humanist ideal. Today, Leonardo is widely considered one of the most diversely talented individuals ever to have lived.

2. Isaac Newton

English physicist and mathematician (described in his own day as a “natural philosopher”) who is widely recognised as one of the most influential scientists of all time and a key figure in the scientific revolution. His book “Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy,” first published in 1687, laid the foundations for classical mechanics. Newton made seminal contributions to optics, and he shares credit with Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz for the development of calculus. Newton’s Principia formulated the laws of motion and universal gravitation, which dominated scientists’ view of the physical universe for the next three centuries. Newton’s work removed the last doubts about the validity of the heliocentric model of the Solar System. Newton built the first practical reflecting telescope and developed a theory of colour based on the observation that a prism decomposes white light into the many colours of the visible spectrum. He formulated an empirical law of cooling, studied the speed of sound, and introduced the notion of a Newtonian fluid. In addition to his work on calculus, as a mathematician Newton contributed to the study of power series, generalised the binomial theorem to non-integer exponents, developed a method for approximating the roots of a function, and classified most of the cubic plane curves. Beyond his work on the mathematical sciences, Newton dedicated much of his time to the study of biblical chronology and alchemy, but most of his work in those areas remained unpublished until long after his death.

1. Nikola Tesla

Serbo-Croation/American inventor, discoverer, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, theoretical and experimental physicist, mathematician, futurist and humanitarian. Tesla was a hyperpolyglot who could speak eight languages including: Serbo-Croatian, English, Czech, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, and Latin. He claimed to have had a three-dimensional memory and thought process that tormented him in his youth, but later aided him with building his inventions in his own mind without wasting any physical energy. He was known to be able to recite by heart full books, mathematical formulas and poetry such as Goethe’s “Faust,” Njegoš’ “The Mountain Wreath,” Dante’s “Divine Comedy,” Shakespeare’s “Hamlet,” Byron’s “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage,” and Pushkin’s “Eugene Onegin.” Tesla has more original inventions to his credit than any other man in history. He has been accounted for 278 patents in 26 different countries. He is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system that we still use today. Tesla was the first to invent and patent a commutatorless alternating current induction motor that led to an AC/DC war with Thomas Edison. All electrical machinery using or generating alternating current is due to Tesla, without which our our electrified power lines, and our subways would be farless advanced. The Tesla Induction Motor, the Tesla Rotary Converter, the Tesla Phase System of Power Transmission, the Tesla Steam and Gas Turbine, the Tesla Coil ( used for radio technology), and the Oscillation Transformer are perhaps his better known inventions. In his labs he conducted a range of experiments with mechanical oscillators/generators, electrical discharge tubes, and early X-ray imaging. He is also the father of remote control, building a wireless controlled boat exhibited in 1898. Although not recognized for, he was the first to discovery the electron, radioactivity, cosmic rays, terrestrial resonance, stationary waves (standing waves), and the first to invent fluorescent light bulbs. He first demonstrated wireless energy/power by lighting his phosphorescent light bulbs wirelessly in a demonstration given before the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia,1893. He also theorized a particle beam to be used for defense in war, and also to produce an artificial Aurora Borealis to light the night skies, and a particle beam to be used for defense in war. He intended to unify all his innovations into one big machine known as his “World System,” but lacked the investments and funds to finish his work on a large scale. His failure to accomplish his goals left him with a distorted persona of a mad scientist, and a dreamer whose imagination created an unrealistic hope for the future. Tesla would eventually die penniless and alone in his New York apartment, but like the two greats above, he lives on through all his inventions and contributions to this world that last until the end of man.

Ahead of their time!

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The 3 Greatest Minds of All Time 3. Leonardo Da Vinci2. Isaac…

The 3 Greatest Minds of All Time

3. Leonardo Da Vinci

2. Isaac Newton

1. Nikola Tesla

Posted in ahead of their time, discovery, engineering, geniuses, goats, history, invention, isaac newton, leonardo da vinci, links, mathematics, nikola tesla, physics, polymath, science

All the genius in one picture

All the genius in one picture

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