Category: demonstrations

drnikolatesla:

Tesla was displaying the first alternating current motors that we still use today for power, and was also doing wizardry lighting wireless light bulbs like a fucking Jedi. The concept was so far ahead of its time that the people in the auditorium literally started panicking and running out the doors because they thought he was doing the devil’s work. His demonstrations would introduce the basic principles to the wireless transmission of energy we all use today in our everyday lives.

Curie is a hard second! She cool!

Tesla was displaying the first alternating current motors that we still use today for power, and was also doing wizardry lighting wireless light bulbs like a fucking Jedi. The concept was so far ahead of its time that the people in the auditorium literally started panicking and running out the doors because they thought he was doing the devil’s work. His demonstrations would introduce the basic principles to the wireless transmission of energy we all use today in our everyday lives.

Nikola Tesla’s Remarkable Experiments With Wireless Lamps and Vacuum Tubes Shown Before the Franklin Institute and the National Electric Light Association in 1893

“These were the most striking results I showed in the transmission of energy… You see how far I have gone into the mastery of electrical vibrations in 1893. I stand here [Fig. 190] in the hall, holding a lamp in my hand, and the energy transmitted lights it. Here again [Fig. 191] I hold a phosphorescent bulb in my hand, and here [Fig. 192] a vacuum tube.

“These experiments, I remember, were made in St. Louis. There was a hall with 6,000 or 7,000 people. When I explained how I had shown a phosphorescent bulb to Lord Kelvin in England, and told them that the bulb was going to spring into light, and the current was turned on and it did burst into light, there was a stampede in the to upper galleries and they all rushed out. They thought it was some part of the devil’s work, and ran out. That was the way my experiments were received.”

–Nikola Tesla

(Tesla explaining his wireless art in a pre-hearing interview with his legal counsel in 1916 to protect his radio patents from the Guglielmo Marconi and the Marconi Company.)

“Nikola Tesla On His Works With Alternating Currents and Their Application to Wireless Telegraphy, and Transmission of Power.” Twenty First Century Books, Breckenridge, Colorado, 2002.

“I had been constructing with my assistants the first high-frequency alternators (dynamos), of the kind now used for generating power for wireless telegraphy. At three o’clock in the morning I came to the conclusion that I had overcome all the difficulties and that the machine would operate, and I sent my men to get something to eat. While they were gone I finished getting the machine ready, and arranged things so that there was nothing to be done, except to throw in a switch.

“When my assistants returned I took a position in the middle of the laboratory, without any connection whatever between me and the machine to be tested. In each hand I held a long glass tube from which the air had been exhausted. “If my theory is correct,” I said, “when the switch is thrown in these tubes will become swords of fire.” I ordered the room darkened and the switch thrown in—and instantly the glass tubes became brilliant swords of fire.

“Under the influence of great exultation I waved them in circles round and round my head. My men were actually scared, so new and wonderful was the spectacle. They had not known of my wireless light theory, and for a moment they thought I was some kind of a magician or hypnotizer. But the wireless light was a reality, and with that experiment I achieved fame overnight.

“Following this success, people of influence began to take an interest in me. I went into “society,” and I gave entertainments in return; some at home, some in my laboratory–expensive ones, too. For the one and only time in my life, I tried to roar a little bit like a lion.

“But after two years of this, I said to myself, “What have I done in the past twenty-four months?” And the answer was, “Little or nothing.” I recognized that accomplishment requires isolation. I learned that the man who wants to achieve must give up many things—society, diversion, even rest—and must find his sole recreation and happiness in work. He will live largely with his conceptions and enterprises; they will be as real to him as worldly possessions and friends.”

– Nikola Tesla

“Making Your Imagination Work for You.”By M. K. Wisehart. The American Magazine, April 1921.

“I had been constructing with my assistants the first high-frequency alternators (dynamos), of the kind now used for generating power for wireless telegraphy. At three o’clock in the morning I came to the conclusion that I had overcome all the difficulties and that the machine would operate, and I sent my men to get something to eat. While they were gone I finished getting the machine ready, and arranged things so that there was nothing to be done, except to throw in a switch.

“When my assistants returned I took a position in the middle of the laboratory, without any connection whatever between me and the machine to be tested. In each hand I held a long glass tube from which the air had been exhausted. “If my theory is correct,” I said, “when the switch is thrown in these tubes will become swords of fire.” I ordered the room darkened and the switch thrown in—and instantly the glass tubes became brilliant swords of fire.

“Under the influence of great exultation I waved them in circles round and round my head. My men were actually scared, so new and wonderful was the spectacle. They had not known of my wireless light theory, and for a moment they thought I was some kind of a magician or hypnotizer. But the wireless light was a reality, and with that experiment I achieved fame overnight.

“Following this success, people of influence began to take an interest in me. I went into “society,” and I gave entertainments in return; some at home, some in my laboratory–expensive ones, too. For the one and only time in my life, I tried to roar a little bit like a lion.

"But after two years of this, I said to myself, “What have I done in the past twenty-four months?” And the answer was, “Little or nothing.” I recognized that accomplishment requires isolation. I learned that the man who wants to achieve must give up many things—society, diversion, even rest—and must find his sole recreation and happiness in work. He will live largely with his conceptions and enterprises; they will be as real to him as worldly possessions and friends.”

– Nikola Tesla

“Making Your Imagination Work for You.” By M. K. Wisehart. The American Magazine, April 1921.

“I wish to apologize for the frequent appearance of my likeness in these photographs, which is distasteful to me, but was unavoidable. Most of the advances indicated, and a number of others, have resulted from the application of the beautiful principle upon which the operation of this apparatus is based. Scientific men have honored me by identifying it with my name, and I have earnestly endeavored to show myself worthier of this great distinction by devoting to it much of my energies. No desire for material advantages has animated me in all this work, though I hope, for the sake of the continuance of my labors, that these will soon follow, naturally, as a compensation for valuable services rendered to science and industry. To the scientific experts, who are familiar, in theory and experiment, with electrical vibrations, the results here shown will, I believe, speak in eloquent language. But those readers to whom they are naturally less intelligible will ask: What are they good for, and what do they or have they demonstrated? To them it may be said that they have shown and proved among many other things: That ordinary currents can be transformed with high economy into electrical vibrations of any pitch, which are needed in many novel arts; they have shown that electrical energy in great amounts can be efficiently and safely transmitted without the use of wires to any point of the globe, however distant; they have furnished proof that the movements and operation of bodies and machinery carried by the same can be controlled from a great distance without any tangible connection whatever and with absolute precision; they have proved the practicability of a system of signaling without wires, not with the imperfect appliances as before attempted, which can not be tuned and are rendered useless by the play of a small induction coil, but by means of apparatus producing powerful oscillations and circuits in exact synchronism, with which it is impossible to interfere; they have shown that atmospheric nitrogen can be readily combined and valuable products manufactured, merely by the application of cheap water power, and that light, diffusive like that of the sun, can be produced with an economy greater than obtainable in the usual ways and with lamps that never consume.”

–Nikola Tesla

New York, March 26, 1899

Fig. 1. — Lighting a disconnected vacuum bulb of 1,500 candle power by high-frequency currents — Photograph taken by the light of the bulb itself, exposure about two seconds.

Fig. 2. — Table of diagrams illustrating the evolution of a high-tension transformer enabling the production of electro-motive forces of many millions of volts.

Fig. 3. — Photograph showing a part of the laboratory, with a disconnected resonating coil supported on an insulating stand, and illuminated by the streamers produced, other coils remaining unaffected — The pressure developed in the resonating coil is over half a million volts.

Fig. 4. — Photograph showing an incandescent lamp lighted by a synchronized circuit composed of a wire loop and condenser, and energized by waves transmitted from a distance.

Fig. 5. — Photograph showing an incandescent lamp lighted by means of waves transmitted through space to a coil without a condenser.

Fig. 6. — Experiment illustrating the action of a synchronized circuit energized by waves transmitted from a distant oscillator – The energy received is transferred upon another unresponsive circuit, lighting the incandescent lamp attached to the same.

Fig. 7. — Experiment showing a coil energized by the waves of a distant oscillator and adjusted to the capacity of the body of the operator, who preserves himself from injury by maintaining a position at the nodal point, where the intense vibration is little felt — the pressure on the end of the coil towards the reader, which is illuminated by the powerful streamers, is nearly half a million volts.

Fig. 8. — Photograph of the experimenter standing in the middle of the laboratory and lighting a vacuum bulb by waves from a distant oscillator — His body is, in this case, subjected to great electrical pressure.

Fig. 9. — The operator’s body, in this experiment, is charged to a high potential by means of a coil responsive to the waves transmitted to it from a distant oscillator, and a long glass tube waved in the hand is lighted to great brilliance by the electrical charges conveyed to it through the body.

Fig. 10. — Photograph of an active terminal of an improved oscillator, used in Tesla’s experiments for transmitting electrical energy to great distances without wires — Width of illuminated space is 18 feet — The pressure on the terminal is about eight million volts.

“Some Experiments in Tesla’s Laboratory with Currents of High Potential and High Frequency.” Electrical Review, March 29, 1899.