Author: Mathematica

lthmath:

Maurits Cornelis Escher (17 June 1898 – 27 March 1972) was a Dutch graphic artist who made mathematically-inspired woodcuts, lithographs, and mezzotints. He was 70 before a retrospective exhibition was held. His work features mathematical objects and operations including impossible objects, explorations of infinity, reflection, symmetry, perspective, truncated and stellated polyhedra, hyperbolic geometry, and tessellations. 

Although Escher believed he had no mathematical ability, he interacted with the mathematicians George Pólya, Roger Penrose, Harold Coxeter and crystallographer Friedrich Haag, and conducted his own research into tessellation.

Sum-of-Three-Cubes Problem Solved for ‘Stubborn’ Number 33 | Quanta Magazine: undefined

Sum-of-Three-Cubes Problem Solved for ‘Stubborn’ Number 33 | Quanta Magazine: undefined

thirddegreebrainburns:

SUPER cursed image.

thirddegreebrainburns:

SUPER cursed image.

mathblab:

Mathematicians have constructed a very large number of different systems of geometry, Euclidean or non-Euclidean, of one, two, three, or any number of dimensions. All these systems are of complete and equal validity. They embody the results of mathematicians’ observations of their reality, a reality far more intense and far more rigid than the dubious and elusive reality of physics. The old-fashioned geometry of Euclid, the entertaining seven-point geometry of Veblen, the space-times of Minkowski and Einstein, are all absolutely and equally real.

G. H. Hardy

mathblab:

Mathematicians have constructed a very large number of different systems of geometry, Euclidean or non-Euclidean, of one, two, three, or any number of dimensions. All these systems are of complete and equal validity. They embody the results of mathematicians’ observations of their reality, a reality far more intense and far more rigid than the dubious and elusive reality of physics. The old-fashioned geometry of Euclid, the entertaining seven-point geometry of Veblen, the space-times of Minkowski and Einstein, are all absolutely and equally real.

G. H. Hardy

numb3rth30ry:

An exceedingly clever visualization of a Cauchy Product

The first leap of creativity is choosing to represent quantities as black and red squares. Each black square has value 1, each red square has value -1.

The checkerboard is constructed by expanding both series to be multiplied. Each series is written term-wise along the edge of a grid. I.e., one expanded series is written vertically, left of the rows, and the other is written horizontally, above the columns. Each row (or column, cell, etc.) can be obtained by multiplying the corresponding values along the rows and columns.

For example: the upper-left corner cell represents (1)x(1)=1, a black square. The cell to its right (in the same row) represents (1)x(-1)=-1, a red square. The pattern alternates accordingly. 

Observe how all the squares along the diagonal, from the corner, are also black. This is because they represent products of matching signs (both positive or negative), and are thus always positive. For similar reasons, all diagonals (and anti-diagonals) have the same color.

The checkerboard represents the left-hand side of the Cauchy product–it is obtained by multiplying two series. The right hand side of the Cauchy product, a single, new series, is represented by the pyramidal structure pointed to by the arrow.

The pyramid is made by reorganizing the checkerboard. To see how, imagine isolating each anti-diagonal. Beginning with the smallest anti-diagonals and working outward, rotate the square(s) and add them together, so they fit side by side (making rectangles). Layer the rectangles top to bottom from smallest to largest. 

Since successive diagonals alternate in sign (positive/negative), we obtain a pyramid of alternating black and red layers. Each layer has one more square than the previous. Recalling that black squares are positive 1′s and reds are negative, we can convert the layers of the pyramid into individual terms of an alternating series

image

which is the right-hand side of the Cauchy product. Incredible!

Mathematics is beautiful. <3

numb3rth30ry:

An exceedingly clever visualization of a Cauchy Product

The first leap of creativity is choosing to represent quantities as black and red squares. Each black square has value 1, each red square has value -1.

The checkerboard is constructed by expanding both series to be multiplied. Each series is written term-wise along the edge of a grid. I.e., one expanded series is written vertically, left of the rows, and the other is written horizontally, above the columns. Each row (or column, cell, etc.) can be obtained by multiplying the corresponding values along the rows and columns.

For example: the upper-left corner cell represents (1)x(1)=1, a black square. The cell to its right (in the same row) represents (1)x(-1)=-1, a red square. The pattern alternates accordingly. 

Observe how all the squares along the diagonal, from the corner, are also black. This is because they represent products of matching signs (both positive or negative), and are thus always positive. For similar reasons, all diagonals (and anti-diagonals) have the same color.

The checkerboard represents the left-hand side of the Cauchy product–it is obtained by multiplying two series. The right hand side of the Cauchy product, a single, new series, is represented by the pyramidal structure pointed to by the arrow.

The pyramid is made by reorganizing the checkerboard. To see how, imagine isolating each anti-diagonal. Beginning with the smallest anti-diagonals and working outward, rotate the square(s) and add them together, so they fit side by side (making rectangles). Layer the rectangles top to bottom from smallest to largest. 

Since successive diagonals alternate in sign (positive/negative), we obtain a pyramid of alternating black and red layers. Each layer has one more square than the previous. Recalling that black squares are positive 1′s and reds are negative, we can convert the layers of the pyramid into individual terms of an alternating series

image

which is the right-hand side of the Cauchy product. Incredible!

Mathematics is beautiful. <3

logicandgrace:

“om poornamadah poornamidam poornaat poornamudachyate |
poornasya poornamaadaaya poornamevaavashishyate ||
om shaantih shaanthih shanthih ||”

brihadaranyaka upanishad

“That is full, this is also full,
From the full if you take away the full,
What remains will also be full”

(via kuraiondrumillai)